Blackberry Review Series : Market Realist

BlackBerry launches its Classic smartphone to attract enterprises

Market Realist

BlackBerry has been reduced to a niche smartphone player (Part 4 of 12)

(Continued from Part 3)

BlackBerry introduced the Classic smartphone with a physical keyboard

In the previous part of this series, we discussed why BlackBerry (BBRY) couldn’t reap the benefits of the Passport’s successful launch last quarter. BlackBerry introduced another important smartphone last month—the Classic. As the name suggests, the Classic takes brings back old BlackBerry features along with the re-introduction of the physical keyboard.

After the launch of the BlackBerry 10 operating system in 2013, the company had stopped introducing smartphones with physical keyboards and launched touch-screen phones only. BlackBerry may have changed this strategy due to the increasing popularity of Apple’s (AAPL) iPhone and other touch-screen smartphones introduced by Samsung (SSNLF), Sony (SNE), and Lenovo (LNVGY). However, BlackBerry quickly realized that it can’t compete in this market—and it’s better that it focuses on what it had been doing best, which is catering to enterprise professionals’ productivity needs.

Enterprise customers have remained die-hard fans of BlackBerry’s smartphones due to their physical keyboard. The physical keyboard provides ease of use for working professionals—especially for writing emails and taking calls—which is why BlackBerry listened to their demands and brought back this feature.

BlackBerry introduced superior features in the Classic

The Classic has better specifications that its predecessor, the Bold 9900 smartphone. The Classic’s screen size is larger than the Bold’s at 3.5 inches, although much smaller than the 5.5-inch Apple iPhone 6 Plus screen size. It has a dual core 1.5 GHz Qualcomm (QCOM) Snapdragon processoralong with 2 GB of RAM. The above chart shows the difference between the Classic and the Bold 9900, which makes the Classic a superior smartphone to the Bold in terms of specifications.

Continue to Part 5

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